ARMED CONFLICTS: THEIR AFTERMATH

Winter 2013 Day of Service
Monday, December 9, 2013

Armed conflict and loss of life are perpetuated
throughout history, but the effects of war
linger on long after arms are laid down.
Remaining in the silence after the gunshots
are veterans suffering from Post Traumatic
Stress Syndrome (PTSD), refugees fleeing
their homes to encounter language barriers,
loneliness and poverty, among other effects.
 During a Day of Service in December of 2013, the Woodhall community sought to discover the lasting consequences of armed conflicts in our greater community, whether they occurred a generation ago or during the present day, or whether they happened a thousand miles away or next door. Our students will be leaders who weigh the consequences of war and make thoughtful, informed decisions in regards to armed combat.

Some of the immersion sites from the day included:

Connecticut’s Veterans History Project (Waterbury, CT) In a joint partnership with Central Connecticut State University and the Veteran’s History Project, students spent the day recording interviews with veterans from World War II, Vietnam, and the Korean Wars about their experiences. The recorded interviews will be archived in the Library of Congress. Congresswoman Elizabeth Esty the U.S. Representative for the 5th District of Connecticut also participated with the group, interviewing and meeting with the veterans.

Integrated Refugee & Immigrant Services – IRIS (New Haven, CT) Often armed conflicts disrupt homes, causing citizens of countries to flee to find refuge. A small group went to help clean and prepare an apartment for an Iraqi family that was arriving to the U.S. later in the week.